The place to ask China-related questions!
Beijing Shanghai Guangzhou Shenzhen Chengdu Xi'an Hangzhou Qingdao Dalian Suzhou Nanjing More Cities>>

Categories

Close
Welcome to eChinacities Answers! Please or register if you wish to join conversations or ask questions relating to life in China. For help, click here.
X

Verify email

Your verification code has been sent to:

Didn`t receive your code? Resend code

By continuing you agree to eChinacities's Privacy Policy .

Sign up with Google Sign up with Facebook
Sign up with Email Already have an account? .
Posts: 11

Minor Official

3
1
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
4

Q: How can one easily adopt the Chinese characters

How do i easily adopt or learn Chinese way of life

1 year 12 weeks ago in  Lifestyle - China

 
Highest Voted
Posts: 548

Shifu

3
4
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

Your question is confusing (as many questions on here are). You do not provide enough context to decipher what your true intent is. When you mentioned Chinese characters, it implies to me that you want to know how to learn the Chinese language better. But then you mention about learning the Chinese way of life. That indicates to me that you want to learn more about their culture and society. 

 

The easiest answer for both scenarios is to put yourself out there. Have a passion and dedication for it. Be inquisitive and research through personal experience, as well as through the internet. 

 

After 9 years living in China, I have yet to learn the language in any manner to have a conversation with Chinese people without the help of a translator. I just do not have a passion to learn new languages. But I do have a very good understanding of culture and the dynamics of their societies. I found their traditions and the lightning fast evolution of their culture taking place in the 21st century to be fascinating. Being an outsider, and having been here to see the transitions occurring is something that interests me greatly. 

 

For example, being a high school teacher, I have been here long enough to observe the transition of the culture of teen relationships. What was once taboo in many respects has very quickly evolved into a much more open and accepting culture of youth dating. In fact, it has rapidly evolved to begin accepting gay relationships among their peers. I feel almost as an anthropologist hidden behind a duck screen observing a society covertly as things change. 

 

As the older generation dies off with their rigid cultural and societal expectations of days long passed, and the younger generation being influenced by western and universal cultural ideals through music, movies, and the internet, they are the future of China. To watch the hardline of governmental control and involvement in society being remolded for a 21st century future of younger "politicians" is exciting. Where it leads is anyone's guess. Much like it must have been going from a Chairman Mao's socialist/communist regime to a country that developed a balancing act with those beliefs with capitalism and more independent freedoms that changed China forever. 

Report Abuse
1 year 12 weeks ago
 
Answers (1)
Comments (0)
Posts: 548

Shifu

3
4
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

Your question is confusing (as many questions on here are). You do not provide enough context to decipher what your true intent is. When you mentioned Chinese characters, it implies to me that you want to know how to learn the Chinese language better. But then you mention about learning the Chinese way of life. That indicates to me that you want to learn more about their culture and society. 

 

The easiest answer for both scenarios is to put yourself out there. Have a passion and dedication for it. Be inquisitive and research through personal experience, as well as through the internet. 

 

After 9 years living in China, I have yet to learn the language in any manner to have a conversation with Chinese people without the help of a translator. I just do not have a passion to learn new languages. But I do have a very good understanding of culture and the dynamics of their societies. I found their traditions and the lightning fast evolution of their culture taking place in the 21st century to be fascinating. Being an outsider, and having been here to see the transitions occurring is something that interests me greatly. 

 

For example, being a high school teacher, I have been here long enough to observe the transition of the culture of teen relationships. What was once taboo in many respects has very quickly evolved into a much more open and accepting culture of youth dating. In fact, it has rapidly evolved to begin accepting gay relationships among their peers. I feel almost as an anthropologist hidden behind a duck screen observing a society covertly as things change. 

 

As the older generation dies off with their rigid cultural and societal expectations of days long passed, and the younger generation being influenced by western and universal cultural ideals through music, movies, and the internet, they are the future of China. To watch the hardline of governmental control and involvement in society being remolded for a 21st century future of younger "politicians" is exciting. Where it leads is anyone's guess. Much like it must have been going from a Chairman Mao's socialist/communist regime to a country that developed a balancing act with those beliefs with capitalism and more independent freedoms that changed China forever. 

Report Abuse
1 year 12 weeks ago
 
Know the answer ?
Please or register to post answer.

Report Abuse

Security Code: * Enter the text diplayed in the box below
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <img> <br> <p> <u>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Textual smileys will be replaced with graphical ones.

More information about formatting options

Forward Question

Answer of the DayMORE >>
A: 1. Apply at FindJobz, top L corner of this screen! 2. Have a look
A:1. Apply at FindJobz, top L corner of this screen! 2. Have a look over the Internet with "Requirements for an English teaching job in China" in search for more details.You could also look at the guidance titled "How to use an Internet, search engines in particular ..." for more in-dept knowledge. 3. As you can see from no. 2,, main requirement for an ET job in China is holding of a native English passport (UK, Ireland, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and S. Africa), no different than anywhere else in the world. 4. Non-English native passport holders qualify for an ET job in China only if they hold BA degree completed in the native English country.However, most recruiters and hiring managers in China aren't aware of that exemption, so if you hold a degree from one or two native English countries, I suggest you include that into Introduction letter. Good lucky! P.S.Application for the NASA's Moon-to-Mars Program at the Cape Canaveral is less stringent than applying for an ET job as a non-native Englisher ...That of course, is an opinion of a non-English native teacher with lengthy English teaching experience in several different countries.  -- icnif77